What Acquisitions Editors and Series Editors Do, and How that Affects your Book

Even though the resources I consulted when preparing my book proposal discussed the difference between an acquisitions (sometimes called an “acquiring” or “commissioning”) editor and a series editor, this distinction did not quite fully sink in until I was at the point of proposing my book. This post is meant to complement my post on types of personal connections you can have to editors. Knowing the difference between acquisitions editors (full-time press employees) and series editors (full-time professors who also work for a press) can help you better understand how you are likely to cultivate different relationships with each over the course of your academic career.

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Uncommon Academic Book Publishing Advice, Tidbit #2: Personal Connections to Editors

After spending years revising my dissertation into a book, I finally found myself at the academic book proposal stage. I’d identified which presses published in my field(s), compiled information about what each press wanted in a proposal, drafted a base proposal, and was seeking advice from my colleagues and mentors on it. I thought I was approximately one month from the submission point, and had the book manuscript almost ready to go. Continue reading “Uncommon Academic Book Publishing Advice, Tidbit #2: Personal Connections to Editors”

Start Marketing your First Academic Book Now: 13 Actionable Steps

First time book authors often assume that the marketing comes after the book is published, and is primarily the responsibility of the press. Like the author of this article on “7 Mistakes I Made When I Published my First Academic Book,” I wish I would have thought more seriously about marketing my book before it in the world.

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Obliger Professors: 3 Unconventional Ways to Say Yes to Your Projects

Do you feel like you’ve read every writing and productivity book published for new faculty and scholarly writers, but still struggle to make progress on your projects? Do you make commitments to write at certain times, only to find that something urgent causes you to break your appointment? Do you find yourself taking on too many commitments, yet struggling to say no to new ones?

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More Time to Write: 5 Ways to use Microsoft Word’s “Speak” in your Car

Did your new faculty job come with a long (45 min+ each way) car commute? Do you struggle to gain traction on your research projects because you feel like you have to sacrifice your precious early morning to make it to campus? Do you slog through afternoon traffic, loaded down by the weight of a pile of grading, only to arrive home exhausted and stressed? Continue reading “More Time to Write: 5 Ways to use Microsoft Word’s “Speak” in your Car”

How to Save Time Grading and Give Better Feedback as a Professor: Semester, Assignment, and Feedback Design

Save Time Grading, Give Better Feedback- Questions to Spark Change

The biggest struggle I hear other tenure-track faculty at teaching-oriented institutions articulate is the amount of time it takes to teach 2-3 times as many courses as you ever did–most ones you’ve never taught before!–while establishing and maintaining your research agenda.

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Write More, Effortlessly with an Opening Ritual

Write More Effortlessly with an Opening Ritual

Do you struggle to write consistently? Do you put a session on your calendar, but then find other “urgent” things come up? Or that you sit down to write, but instead find yourself, two hours later, responding to emails, reading articles online, or knee-deep in another task that you started because you thought it would be better to just get it out of the way first?

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